General Information

Resources

Jury Information

  • Basic Information for Jurors: The Idaho Supreme Court provides a publication that includes a general description of what to expect if you are called for jury duty. To read the information, please click here.

  • Jury Duty in The Second Judicial District: Serving on a jury is like voting in an election -- both are acts of citizenship that insure that our democracy remains vibrant and just. The right to a jury trial is a cornerstone of Idaho's judicial system and your participation as a juror is critical in giving meaning to this important right. Following are answers to some common questions about jury service in the Second Judicial District.

  • Will I be paid for jury service? Under Idaho law, individuals serving on a jury are entitled to be paid the following compensation by the court for service:
    • $10.00 per day
    • $0.34 per mile travel (round trip)
    Payment and travel mileage will be computed by the court clerk. In addition to compensation by the court, some employers may also provide paid leave for employees who are absent due to jury duty. You need to check with your employer to see if such compensation is available.

  • How long will I be on jury duty? In truth, the answer to this question is "it depends". As described in the Idaho Supreme Court jury pamphlet, the selection of jurors is a several step process, and different time frames apply to each stage of juror service.
    • Jury Panel: A large group of names is selected at random from a combined list of registered voters and Idaho driver's license holders. This group of selected citizens, called a "jury panel", then becomes eligible to be called as potential jurors for individual cases as the need arises. If your name is selected to participate in the "jury panel", your name will remain on the panel list for approximately six (6) months. Check with each individual county court clerk for more specific information about jury panels.
    • Juror for Specific Case: If you are ultimately selected as a juror in a specific case, your jury service will generally last until the case is completed and the judge excuses you from further service on the case. The length of your service will depend entirely on the nature of the case.

  • I have a physical disability. Will my disability be reasonably accommodated if I am selected as a juror? Individuals with physical disabilities or limitations will be reasonably accommodated so that they may participate fully in the jury process. If you are called for jury service and you believe you may need such accommodation, you are urged to contact the court clerk for your county, and advise them of any accommodations you require so that any necessary arrangements can be made in advance of your juror service.

  • Does the court provide or pay for child care if I am called for jury duty? Unfortunately, the court does not presently have the means to provide child care service for jurors and does not compensate jurors for child care costs. If this presents an extreme hardship, the court may grant you an excuse from jury service.

  • How can I be excused from jury service for work, taking care of a sick child, etc.? Jury service is important, and you will generally not be excused except in the cases where jury service imposes an extreme hardship to you. It is up to each judge to determine whether or not your circumstances justify excusing you from jury duty. If you believe you need to be excused from jury service for any reason, please contact the court clerk for your county and request an excuse.
    • Medical Excuses: If you are requesting an excuse from jury duty due to an illness, an important scheduled medical appointment or other medically related reason, you generally will need to provide the court a written statement from your physician or other similar documentation sufficient to justify your excuse from jury duty.
    • Work-Related Excuses: If you are employed, it is expected that jury service will most likely cause you to miss some amount of work and therefore it is unlikely that you will be granted an excuse for work related reasons. If you believe that interruption of your work schedule by jury service will create an extreme hardship to you, you may still request an excuse. Be prepared to provide the court with a letter from your employer or other similar documentation showing how jury service will adversely affect you.